HOLY CROSS CHURCH - CLOCK OUR HISTORICAL HERITAGE

 

 

The Church of St Mark (also known as Holy Cross) in Mark,  dates from the 13th century, but is mainly a 14th and 15th century building with further restoration in 1864. It has been designated as a Grade I listed building.  There may have been a chapel in the village from the 12th century however the current church was dedicated by William, Bishop of Bath and Wells in April 1268 as The Church of the Holy Cross. The nave has a Barrel roof decorated with the heads of religious figures. In the Choir is a wooden sculpture of the Four Evangelists made by a Belgian sculptor named André in 1524 for St. Salvator's Cathedral in Bruges, which was moved in 1794.

 

The tower was built around 1407 It contains a peel of eight bells. The clock celebrates the jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887 and we are sure that the community are not only proud of the magnificent Church Building but also the Clock which has been ringing out the hours for over 130 years.

 

In late 2019, whilst Smiths of Derby were carrying out the last annual service on the clock they discussed some restoration work and repairs of the clock dials.  They recommended to access the clock dial from rope access, remove the clock hands, dial and dial works.  The dial works pass through the fabric of the building and rarely receive full servicing attention, and it would be prudent therefore to carry out this work during the restoration operation. The driving tubes would be separated and all corrosion removed, the tubes re-polished and correctly lubricated. The gearing would also be serviced and adjusted as necessary for correct operation. The result of this would be that the clock would be under less strain and wear. Smiths would sympathetically abrade the dial down to a sound base and repair the fractures, followed by the application anti corrosion treatment and primers, undercoat and finally weatherproof gloss, for maximum protection. The dials would then be baked in an oven at 80°c to achieve a hard enamel like finish and for maximum longevity.

 

Any previously gilded areas would be sized, followed by the application of gold leaf, as specified above. This is particularly long lasting and attractive and is used in preference to ordinary gold paint. The latter soon loses its fresh appearance and deteriorates quickly, whereas gold leaf has an expected life span of 20 – 25 years (subject to local conditions). The hands would be similarly treated.

 

The Parish Council discussed working with others to finance the work which does not come cheap and would welcomed offers of financial support  or any other ideas from the residents of Mark. We are sure that the community would like to see it carried out so the clock can continue ringing out the hours for another 100 years.

 

 

The Church Clock was financed many years ago by the Parish and remains in their ownership and responsibility of the Parish.  Applications were made for financial assistance from local organisations and the PCC, and we made an appeal to the community for donations to assist with the cost of the work.  

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY 6th AUGUST 2020

 

 

THE CHURCH CLOCK BEING REMOVED BY SMITH'S OF DERBY FOR A LONG OVERDUE REFURBISHMENT - WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING TWO SPARKLING CLOCK FACES WHEN IT RETURNS!!  

 

A BIG "THANK YOU" TO EVERYONE IN THE VILLAGE WHO MADE A DONATION TOWARDS THE REFURBISHMENT!

 

 

With thanks to Jane Mason for the video
CC Removal - Video.MOV
MOV File [17.0 MB]

 

 

 

TUESDAY 6th OCTOBER 2020 and WEDNESDAY 7th OCTOBER 2020

 

We have a beautiful sparkling clock returned to the Church of the Holy Cross.   As many people have said, they have had to start wearing a watch again to see what the time is!  The clock has been much missed! 

 

 

 

 

With many thanks to Lois Campbell, Eileen Corkish, Sue Gilmour, Paula Knott, Jane Mason and Jendy Weekes for the photos and video.

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